Imagine that you're sitting outside waiting on some tasty BBQ. There are a few clouds around, but nothing serious. Then, KABOOM a huge lightning strike causes an immediate change of clothing. That's what happened to a Colorado family recently.

This happened last week near Evergreen, Colorado.

Here's how the family described what happened:

We were at home grilling for dinner with some friends. Storms were moving in from the west, the camera faces east, as I was putting burgers on the grill I saw a flash and heard the crack of thunder at the same time. We turned and saw the smoke from the strike. About an hour later I looked to see if my Ring camera had captured the strike, and sure enough, it had.

I have to admit that I don't have any confirmation that there was a change of clothing required after this lightning strike, but I wouldn't blame them if they did.

How can you know that you're in danger of getting hit by lightning? Weather.gov provides some simple math when you hear thunder to determine how close lightning might be.

If you count the number of seconds between the flash of lightning and the sound of thunder, and then divide by 5, you'll get the distance in miles to the lightning: 5 seconds = 1 mile, 15 seconds = 3 miles, 0 seconds = very close.

Thought Co. adds some other danger signs to watch for including rapidly increasing clouds, distant thunder and any severe thunderstorm warnings. They add that there are signs that you're in danger of an imminent strike including hair on your arms standing up and a metallic taste in your mouth.

This Colorado family was very fortunate that they were not on the receiving end of this massive bolt.

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